Elsewhere: “Review: ‘An Old Junker: a senior represents’ by Howard Junker” on Ruelle Electrique

Standard

Word.

Ruelle Electrique just published my review of “An Old Junker: A senior represents,” by Howard Junker. For his latest effort, the former ZYZZYVA editor has taken on the role of bricoleur, constructing an entertaining nonfiction novel out of blog posts he’d written between the period of 2006-2010. By presenting us his “greatest hits” (with blog entries reordered into more cohesive categories), Junker provides a funny and engaging composite portrait of an editor.

Read the article »

View archive of my Ruelle Electrique articles »

Elsewhere: “Review: ‘The Borrower’ by Rebecca Makkai” on Ruelle Electrique

Standard

Rating:  ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ 1/2

Ruelle Electrique just posted a new and very short review of mine of Rebecca Makkai’s “The Borrower.” Hopefully the book title doesn’t subliminally incite folks to subliminally just “borrow” a copy from their public library, as it definitely is a keeper more suitable for one’s own personal library. For a debut novel, “The Borrower” is marvelous in its humor, its heart, and its scope.

Read the article »

View archive of my Ruelle Electrique articles »

Elsewhere: “Review: Emma Donoghue’s ‘Room'” on Ruelle Electrique

Standard

Can you imagine reading 321 pages worth of a novel narrated by a five-year-old voice? Thanks to Emma Donoghue’s able hands, the precocious little narrator in her Man Booker Prize-nominated novel, “Room,” makes for a wonderful read sans any annoyance. Head over to the Ruelle to read the full review.

Read the article »

View archive of my Ruelle Electrique articles »

Elsewhere: “Review: Gary Shteyngart’s ‘Super Sad True Love Story'” on Ruelle Electrique

Standard

Rating:  ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

Visit Ruelle Electrique to read my latest review of Gary Shteyngart’s “Super Sad True Love Story,” a super sad and super good novel set in a futuristic America immersed in 24/7 social media. In this dystopian world, reading books is frowned upon, and as such acronyms abound in daily life communications: LOL, JBF, J/K, ROOFLARP! Quelle horreur! A master humorist, Shteyngart, as you may recall, was named earlier this year as one of “The New Yorker’s” 20 Under 40 Best Writers. I highly recommend this fun, sad, and surprisingly moving novel.

Share your thoughts on Ruelle Electrique.

Read the article »

View archive of my Ruelle Electrique articles »

Elsewhere: “Review: James Franco’s ‘Palo Alto'” on Ruelle Electrique

Standard

Rating:  ☆ ☆ ☆ 1/2

I just published a review of James Franco’s “Palo Alto” on Ruelle Electrique. The ubiquitous Renaissance Man has put together a collection of short stories that, though uneven, combine to form a nonetheless impressive glimpse at teenage inquietude. Read more and share your thoughts on Ruelle Electrique.

Read the article »

View archive of my Ruelle Electrique articles »

Review: “Tinkers” by Paul Harding

Standard

Rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

Paul Harding

I must confess that I’ve had a cobwebbed copy of Paul Harding’s “Tinkers” on my desk for almost half a year now. I’d first heard of the book on some “Top 10 (or 100?) Books” list at the end of last year, thought it an interesting read, and subsequently rented it via Bookswim. It’s no tome (it’s a measly 190 pages), yet I seemed always to perpetually defer reading it for the abstract future. Maybe I was anxious of any depressive effects it might have on me; the opening line, “George Washington Crosby began to hallucinate eight days before he died,” wasn’t exactly the most cheerful hook. But when I finally did hunker down to finish the damn thing, I emerged from behind the book not filled with gloom, but rather, a bittersweet sense of having to let go of something deeply cherished.

"Tinkers" won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

As I’d earlier mentioned, there is indeed death; two in fact. In a helical manner, the story intertwines the deaths–and lives–of its two main characters, George Crosby and his father Howard Crosby. The story begins with George’s impending death. We first find him on his deathbed with his family keeping vigil around him, ravaged by a host of diseases. In his more healthful days, we learn, he was a repairer of clocks and quite a handyman. A tinker, just like his salesman father Howard, who himself was also beset by disease. Howard’s ordeals were terrifying epileptic seizures that gnawed away at not just his well-being, but also his family’s. George as a preteen had run away from home, albeit unsuccessfully, conflicted in his love for his father and his hate for his father’s “madness.” In an ironic twist, it is Howard who would run away–successfully–upon learning of his wife’s plan to send him to a mental institution. He started anew in a different town with a new name, a new job, and even a new wife. In the novel’s third chapter, after George’s and Howard’s disappearance from each other’s lives, we are afforded the backstory of Howard’s own father, a minister who also suffered from bouts of madness, and whom Howard as a child had watched carted away to a facility for the insane. Through this revelation Howard’s running away is imbued a tinge of tragedy (history repeats, a father and son are separated yet again); we can also infer that upon Howard’s disappearance, George must have felt something akin to Howard’s pining as a child for his own father. In his new second life Howard passed away rather quietly, beside his second wife Megan, musing about how he may just be a shadow of another, which itself may also be a shadow of another. The story arcs back to George on his deathbed: His last thought, we learn, was of Christmas dinner 1953, the night that Howard, having tracked him down, paid him a surprise visit. In a beautifully hushed ending, neither declaiming nor trumpeting, father and son are finally reunited, “joined” like parts of a clock.

The story conjured up in me a memory of Toni Morrison’s “Song of Solomon,” which though a completely different being in itself, tackled the same subject (fathers and sons) in an equally moving way. The narrative is rather beautifully fragmented, with tenses and perspectives constantly shifting, like a live creature in itself, breathing and moving to and fro. Also dynamic is the language itself, which is just so amazingly pliant, so alive. The novel is such a beautiful collage of scenes. So many stand out, but not in a slapdash vignette-y kind of way. Among those burned in my memory: The scene in which George learns all the clocks have been stopped (“he heard the ratchet and click of clocks, which did not seem to him to tick but to breathe and to give one another comfort by merely being in one another’s presence, like a gathering of people”); Howard’s encounters with the hermit claiming to have known Nathaniel Hawthorne; Howard eavesdropping on young George giving a dead mouse a Viking’s burial; Howard’s wish for his son to have successfully run away, only to find him and return him home (“I just wish that you had made it beyond the bounds of this cold little radius, that when the archaeologists brush off this layer of our world in a million years and string off the boundaries of our rooms and tag and number every plate and table leg and shinbone, you would not be there; yours would not be the remains they would find and label juvenile male…“); Howard’s painful separation from his father (“I had lately noticed him looking at me with a sort of wistfulness, as if he were not looking at me, but at a drawing or photograph of me, as if he were remembering me”). I can go on and on, and construct possibly the longest run-on sentence in history, but I’ll stop while I’m ahead.

Harding apparently had a hell of a time getting any takers for his morose little novel, and when it finally did get published, it failed to attract the attention of any sizeable readership. With I believe only around 7,000 copies sold, it surprisingly landed the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. I’m sure by now, after its anointment and affirmation by the Pulitzer, that that number has increased severalfold, and rightly so.